. Energy News .

Breeding Ozone-Tolerant Crops
by Don Comis
Washington DC (SPX) Aug 25, 2011

A team of ARS and University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign scientists have been screening soybean varieties for ozone tolerance and found that future levels of ground-level ozone could reduce soybean yields by an average 23 percent. Photo courtesy of NRCS-USDA.

U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) scientists working with the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign found that future levels of ground-level ozone could reduce soybean yields by an average 23 percent.

Randy Nelson, geneticist and research leader with the USDA Agricultural Research Service Soybean/Maize Germplasm, Pathology, and Genetics Research Unit in Urbana, Ill., and Lisa Ainsworth, a molecular biologist with the ARS Global Change and Photosynthesis Research Unit in Urbana, are screening soybean varieties for ozone tolerance and sensitivity in SoyFACE (Soybean Free Air Concentration Enrichment) experiments.

They are working with Amy Betzelberger, a graduate research assistant in the Department of Plant Biology at the University of Illinois, and other University of Illinois colleagues.

ARS is USDA's principal intramural scientific research agency.

SoyFACE involves testing plants in open-air field conditions under atmospheric conditions predicted for the year 2050. At that time, ozone concentrations are expected to be 50 percent higher than today's concentrations.

During 2007 and 2008, Nelson, Ainsworth, Betzelberger and their colleagues tested 10 Midwestern soybean varieties that had been released between 1952 and 2003. The varieties were selected from initial tests of 22 cultivars and experimental lines evaluated for four years.

The researchers found that exposure to 82 parts per billion (ppb) ozone reduced soybean yields by an average 23 percent across all 10 varieties. They also found significant differences in ozone tolerance among the varieties. This shows the potential for breeding more ozone-tolerant varieties.

Since ozone concentrations have been rising for decades, the scientists initially thought that varieties developed more recently would be more ozone-tolerant. But the scientists didn't see any significant improvement in ozone tolerance in soybean varieties released since the 1980s.

This research, in support of the USDA priority of responding to climate change, is described in the journal Plant, Cell and Environment.

Related Links
Farming Today - Suppliers and Technology

Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
Buy Advertising Editorial Enquiries

. Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Radical overhaul of farming could be 'game-changer' for global food security
Stockholm, Sweden (SPX) Aug 25, 2011
According to the authors of new research released at the World Water Week in Stockholm, a radical transformation in the way farming and natural systems interact could simultaneously boost food production and protect the environment-two goals that often have been at odds. The authors warn, however, that the world must act quickly if the goal is to save the Earth's main breadbasket areas-whe ... read more

e2v supply the imaging sensor focal plane to SSTL UK for the NigeriaSat-2 Earth observation satellite

Google Maps taking armchair explorers to the Amazon

Airborne Sensor Helps Firefighters Battle Flames

Watching the ice sheet of Antarctica flow

Researchers Improving GPS Accuracy In The Third Dimension

ASA Search and Rescue Software Used To Locate Capsized Boat Off Ireland

Software said to improve GPS accuracy

Two SOPS calls on reliable spare for active service

Argentina, Uruguay end pulp mill row

Reforestation and Lions in Greece

Cambodian 'Avatars' rally to save forest

Increased tropical forest growth could release carbon from the soil

Morocco taps benefits of Barbary fig oil

Making Tomorrow's Bioenergy Yeasts Strong

Cars could run on recycled newspaper, Tulane scientists say

Hydrogen cars fill up at sewage plant

Japan to increase renewable energy?

New Government Incentive Delivers Massive Upside to China Solar Market

National Solar Power announces world's largest solar farm finalists

BrightSource Energy Launches SolarPLUS

Wind Power Now Less Expensive Than Natural Gas In Brazil

BMW to power Leipzig factory by wind energy

Chinese turbine maker enters Irish project

ACS Group sells Spain wind farm portfolio

Hopes fade for 26 trapped in China mine

Mongolian miner signs coal deal with China firms

Pinera under fire over coal mine project

China rescuers end search for Guizhou miners

Patient dies in China after hospital staff flee fire

China bans songs by Lady Gaga, Backstreet Boys

Clashes at China hospital over patient's death

China bans songs in culture crackdown

Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News

The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2011 - Space Media Network. AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement