. Energy News .

Chile is more dangerous for Argentina than vice versa
by Staff Writers
Sydney, Australia (SPX) Jul 20, 2011

Species like the sweet briar rose (Rosa rubiginosa) will be difficult to eradicate because they are now so widespread. 22 non-native species which occur in Chile on connecting roads leading to Argentina present a high risk according to the researchers. Photo: Stefan Klotz/UFZ.

Invasive plant species in Chile pose a higher threat to its neighbour, Argentina, than vice versa. This was concluded by scientists from the University of Concepcion in Chile and the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ) after analysing the flora of both countries. In particular, 22 non-native species which occur in Chile on connecting roads leading to Argentina present a high risk according to the researchers, writing in the journal Biological Invasions.

Trade between Chile and Argentina mainly takes place by road. Over the past decade, the quantity of road freight between the two countries has more than tripled. Although the Andes once functioned as a natural barrier between both countries, the mountain range has been made increasingly porous by the increase in transport.

Of the 875 alien species, nearly 300 occur only in Chile and the same quantity solely in Argentina while more than 300 are found in both countries. Invasive species can disturb ecosystems and cause severe damage to agriculture.

Researchers say the most dangerous species for the neighbouring country is yellow glandweed or yellow bartsia (Parentucellia viscosa), an annual herb native to the Mediterranean region which has already spread into 10 provinces of Chile within 48 years. "In our view, particular attention should be paid to shrubs and trees," concludes Dra Nicol Fuentes.

"Species like the elmleaf blackberry (Rubus ulmifolius), sweet briar rose (Rosa rubiginosa) and silver wattle (Acacia dealbata) will be difficult to eradicate because they are now so widespread. However, we're still optimistic regarding the Portuguese broom (Cytisus striatus), which is only just starting to spread."

In the biologists' view, it is important for scientists and other experts to set priorities for measures to counter invasive species. "Cooperation between neighbouring countries in the joint planning of countermeasures would be the most effective way of investing taxpayers' money into the prevention and control of invasive plant species. This was shown by our investigation," explains Dr Ingolf Kuhn from UFZ.

Two years ago, the combined team of researchers from Chile and Germany evaluated the development of flora in Chile since 1900. Of the more than 70,000 samples in the herbarium at the University of Concepcion, they identified 1,997 indigenous and 629 non-native plants. It turned out that within the space of a single century, invasive species had spread almost throughout the territory.

The centre of this spread is the Mediterranean climate zone, where the Spanish colonial rulers began introducing farming from their European homeland in 1520. When Chilean agriculture and hence also grain production grew rapidly between 1910 in 1940, the invasive species spread swiftly.

In order to assess the risk resulting from certain species, the researchers used a method from Australia, where plant species from Europe are also a problem. Australian, Czech and German scientists demonstrated in a recently published study that 750 plant species from central Europe are now to be found in Australia.

Most of the species arrived between 1840 and 1880 as well as between 1980 and the present, reflecting the waves of immigration. And around two thirds of them were deliberately introduced into Australia.

They include many species used to decorate gardens such as the common ash (Fraxinus excelsior) and common beech (Fagus sylvatica). The first species thought to have arrived is the common hazel (Corylus avellana), which was first sold at Australian tree nurseries in 1803.

In 1843 it was joined by the Norway maple (Acer platanoides), which was popular among landscape planners when laying out avenues. Given the presence of so many non-native species, researchers expect that others will take hold and spread invasively - albeit with some delay.

Related Links
Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research
Farming Today - Suppliers and Technology

Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
Buy Advertising Editorial Enquiries

. Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Japan bans Fukushima beef shipments over radiation
Tokyo (AFP) July 19, 2011
Japan on Tuesday suspended cattle shipments from Fukushima prefecture on fears of radiation-tainted beef in the country's meat distribution chain, four months after a nuclear accident in the region. Tokyo told Fukushima Governor Yuhei Sato to "halt shipments of all cattle in Fukushima to meat-packing factories," until the safety of the meat can be confirmed, chief government spokesman Yukio ... read more

Tsunami airglow signature could lead to early detection system

Underwater Antarctic Volcanoes

Lockheed Martin and Esri Sign Partnership Towards On-Demand Geospatial Apps and Services

Astrium to build Sentinel-4 atmospheric sensors

Boeing: 2nd Boeing GPS IIF Satellite Ready for Launch from Cape Canaveral

Apple makes first S. Korea payout over tracking

A new algorithm could help prevent midair collisions

AI Solutions to Assist Air Force with GPS Satellite Positioning Data and Analyzing GPS Anomalies

Forests soak up third of fossil fuel emissions: study

Lack of meaningful land rights threaten Indonesian forests

Forest trees remember their roots

Tribes welcome Indonesia's pledge to forest people

EU announces biofuel guidelines

US Air Force: We want to use biofuels

Breaking down cellulose without blasting lignin

Switch from corn to grass would raise ethanol output, cut emissions

Solar Panels Keep Buildings Cool

Westfield Amps Up Sustainability Efforts in Southern California

PV System Test Reports Made Simple

Latest DUNMORE Innovation Adds Unique Identifiers to Backsheet

Estonian wind farm taps GE for turbines

Wind-turbine placement produces tenfold power increase

Bold new approach to wind 'farm' design may provide efficiency gains

2010 Wind Technologies Market Report

China rescuers end search for Guizhou miners

Australia PM hails coal deal amid poll slump

Three die in China coal mine rescue

21 trapped in China iron ore mine: report

China stands firm against Tibet separatism

China tells Tibet monks to 'break with separatists'

Clash in China's Xinjiang killed 20: exile group

China vows to crush stability threats in Tibet

Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News

The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2011 - Space Media Network. AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement