. Energy News .

Europe needs genetically engineered crops
by Staff Writers
London, UK (SPX) Apr 30, 2013

In reality, there is a de facto moratorium in Europe on the cultivation of genetically engineered crops such as maize, cotton, and soybean, even as the same products are imported because there is insufficient capacity to produce them by conventional means at home.

The European Union cannot meet its goals in agricultural policy without embracing genetically engineered crops (GMOs). That's the conclusion of scientists who write in Trends in Plant Science, a Cell Press publication, based on case studies showing that the EU is undermining its own competitiveness in the agricultural sector to its own detriment and that of its humanitarian activities in the developing world.

"Failing such a change, ultimately the EU will become almost entirely dependent on the outside world for food and feed and scientific progress, ironically because the outside world has embraced the technology which is so unpopular in Europe, realizing this is the only way to achieve sustainable agriculture," said Paul Christou of the University of Lleida-Agrotecnio Center and Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats in Spain.

"Many aspects of the EU agricultural policy, including those concerning GMOs, are internally inconsistent and actively obstruct what the policy sets out to achieve," Christou and his colleagues continued.

For instance, the Lisbon Strategy aims to create a knowledge-based bioeconomy and recognizes the potential of GMOs to deliver it, but EU policy on the cultivation of GMOs has created an environment that makes this impossible.

In reality, there is a de facto moratorium in Europe on the cultivation of genetically engineered crops such as maize, cotton, and soybean, even as the same products are imported because there is insufficient capacity to produce them by conventional means at home.

Subsidies designed to support farmers now benefit large producers at the expense of family farms, Christou says. The EU has also banned its farmers from using many pesticides and restricted them from other nonchemical methods of pest control, while allowing food products produced in the same ways to be imported.

"EU farmers are denied freedom of choice-in essence, they are prevented from competing because EU policies actively discriminate against those wishing to cultivate genetically engineered crops, yet exactly the same crops are approved for import," Christou says.

All this, he says, despite the fact that GMOs must pass stringent safety tests and there has been no evidence of harm or health risks, despite more than 15 years of GMO agriculture around the world.

"We recommend the adoption of rational, science-based principles for the harmonization of agricultural policies to prevent economic decline and lower standards of living across the continent," the authors write. And that means short-term political expediency mustn't trump long-term objectives on challenges, including hunger and malnutrition.

Trends in Plant Science, Masip et al.: "Paradoxical EU agricultural policies on genetically engineered crops."


Related Links
Cell Press
Farming Today - Suppliers and Technology

Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Memory Foam Mattress Review

Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News

Get Our Free Newsletters
Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear


Study finds unexpected plant diversity in No. America vital for crops
Madison, Wis. (UPI) Apr 29, 2013
North America, while not known as a plant diversity hot spot, in fact has nearly 4,600 wild relatives of crop plants grown in the United States, scientists say. Those wild varieties include close relatives of globally important food crops such as sunflowers, beans, sweet potatoes and strawberries, they said. The findings are good news for plant breeders who've relied increasingly ... read more

Japan's Mt Fuji to get World Heritage stamp: officials

NASA's HyspIRI: Seeing the Forest and the Trees and More

Satrec Initiative of South Korea Continues Collaboration with UAE for DubaiSat-3 Program

Google says Street View data now take in 50 countries

Russia launches latest satellite in its global positioning system

Northrop Grumman to Demonstrate Open Architecture Navigation System for DARPA

US army seeks new technology to replace GPS

Sat-nav warns London lorry drivers of cyclists

Smoke signals: How burning plants tell seeds to rise from the ashes

In the Northeast, forests with entirely native flora are not the norm

Study Led by NUS Scientists Reveals Escalating Cost of Forest Conservation

Wildfires can burn hot without ruining soil

Recipe for Low-Cost, Biomass-Derived Catalyst for Hydrogen Production

China conducts its first successful bio-fueled airline flight

Bugs produce diesel on demand

New input system for biogas systems

Solar water pumping continues to grow in Paraguay

PV Storage Market Set to Explode to $19 Billion in 2017

Community Solar Coming to City of Aurora and Arapahoe County

Thin-film technology fuels ITN Energy Systems

Wind Power: TUV Rheinland Certifies HybridDrive from Winergy

UK Ministry of Defense Deems Wind Towers a National Security Threat

Wales wind power line to go underground near historic village

U.S. leads in wind installations

Australia in danger of 'carbon bubble'

Greenpeace activists board coal ship off Australia reef

Outside View: Coal exports save lives

China mine blast kills 28: state media

China officials holding secret sauna parties: state media

Cancer victim with jailed family faces China land battle

China hands down death sentences in lending crackdown

China investigating clashes that killed 21

The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2012 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement