. Energy News .

Flower power to purge poison and produce platinum
by Staff Writers
Warwick UK (SPX) Nov 23, 2012

They have devised an approach to demonstrate the feasibility in which they are confident that they can use common classes of flower and plants (such as Alyssum), to remove poisonous chemicals such as arsenic and platinum from polluted land and water courses potentially allowing that land to be reclaimed and reused.

A consortium of researchers led by WMG at the University of Warwick are to embark on a 3 million pounds research programme called "Cleaning Land for Wealth" (CL4W), that will use a common class of flower to restore poisoned soils while at the same time producing perfectly sized and shaped nano sized platinum and arsenic nanoparticles for use in catalytic convertors, cancer treatments and a range of other applications.

A "Sandpit" exercise organised by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) allowed researchers from WMG (Warwick Manufacturing group) at the University of Warwick, Newcastle University, The University of Birmingham, Cranfield University and the University of Edinburgh to come together and share technologies and skills to come up with an innovative multidisciplinary research project that could help solve major technological and environmental challenges.

The researchers pooled their knowledge of how to use plants and bacteria to soak up particular elements and chemicals and how to subsequently harvest, process and collect that material.

They have devised an approach to demonstrate the feasibility in which they are confident that they can use common classes of flower and plants (such as Alyssum), to remove poisonous chemicals such as arsenic and platinum from polluted land and water courses potentially allowing that land to be reclaimed and reused.

That in itself would be a significant achievement, but as the sandpit progressed the researchers found that jointly they had the knowledge to achieve much more than just cleaning up the land.

As lead researcher on the project Professor Kerry Kirwan from WMG at the University of Warwick explained: "The processes we are developing will not only remove poisons such as arsenic and platinum from contaminated land and water courses, we are also confident that we can develop suitable biology and biorefining processes (or biofactories as we are calling them) that can tailor the shapes and sizes of the metallic nanoparticles they will make.

This would give manufacturers of catalytic convertors, developers of cancer treatments and other applicable technologies exactly the right shape, size and functionality they need without subsequent refinement.

"We are also expecting to recover other high value materials such as fine chemicals, pharmaceuticals, anti-oxidants etc. from the crops during the same biorefining process."

EPSRC are so taken with the concept that they have now awarded the research consortium 3 million pounds to develop the technology.


Related Links
University of Warwick
Farming Today - Suppliers and Technology

Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Memory Foam Mattress Review

Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News

Get Our Free Newsletters
Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear


Herbivore defense in ferns
Jena, Germany (SPX) Nov 23, 2012
Unlike flowering plants, bracken ferns do not release any odor signals to attract the enemies of their attackers for their own benefit. They dominated the earth for 200 million years and numerous different species can still be found all over the world: mosses, horsetails and ferns. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology in Jena, Germany, have now found out that brac ... read more

What lies beneath? New survey technique offers detailed picture of our changing landscape

How many Russian Earth observation satellites will be in orbit by 2015?

A SPOT 6 Success Story

China launches third environment monitoring satellite

Researchers Use GPS Tracking to Monitor Crab Behavior

Lockheed Martin Completes Critical Environmental Test on GPS III Pathfinder

Roscosmos Requests Glonass Project Contractor Head's Dismissal

Mobile GPS Tracking capability on JCB ruggedized mobile phones

Maple syrup, moose, and the local impacts of climate change

Dry leaves make for juicy science

Preserve the services of mangroves - Earth's invaluable coastal forests

Massive deforestation risks turning Somalia into desert

Mixing processes could increase the impact of biofuel spills on aquatic environments

Algae can draw energy from other plants

White rot fungus boosts ethanol production from corn stalks, cobs and leaves

14,000 Jobs Possible from Military Biofuels Initiative

Renewable energy could power Australia

Continuation of Arenales solar power plant project secured

New American Chemical Society video series shines a light on transparent solar cells

Rice unveils super-efficient solar-energy technology

Britain: Higher energy bills 'reasonable'

Areva commits to Scotland turbine plant

AREVA deploys its industrial plan to produce a 100 percent French wind power technology

Gannets could be affected by offshore energy developments

China mine blast toll rises to 23

China mine blast kills 18: state media

US shale gas drives up coal exports

Coal investment in Queensland unlikely

Tibetan self-immolates in northwest China

Record numbers flock to take Chinese government test

Chinese insurer hits out at Wen Jiabao report

China passport shows some islands, excludes others

The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2012 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement