Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Farming News .




FARM NEWS
New discovery could stimulate plant growth and increase crop yields
by Staff Writers
Durham, UK (SPX) Jan 16, 2014


Dr Ari Sadanandom with rice plants.

Scientists led by experts at Durham University have discovered a natural mechanism in plants that could stimulate their growth even under stress and potentially lead to better crop yields.

Plants naturally slow their growth or even stop growing altogether in response to adverse conditions, such as water shortage or high salt content in soil, in order to save energy.

They do this by making proteins that repress the growth of the plant. This process is reversed when plants produce a hormone - called Gibberellin - which breaks down the proteins that repress growth.

Growth repression can be problematic for farmers as crops that suffer from restricted growth produce smaller yields The research team, led by the Durham Centre for Crop Improvement Technology, and including experts at the University of Nottingham, Rothamsted Research and the University of Warwick, have discovered that plants have the natural ability to regulate their growth independently of Gibberellin, particularly during times of environmental stress.

They found that plants produce a modifier protein, called SUMO that interacts with the growth repressing proteins.

The researchers believe that by modifying the interaction between the modifier protein and the repressor proteins they can remove the brakes from plant growth, leading to higher yields, even when plants are experiencing stress.

The interaction between the proteins can be modified in a number of ways, including by conventional plant breeding methods and by biotechnology techniques.

The research was carried out on Thale Cress, a model for plant research that occurs naturally throughout most of Europe and Central Asia, but the scientists say the mechanism they have found also exists in crops such as barley, corn, rice and wheat.

Corresponding author Dr Ari Sadanandom, Associate Director of the Durham Centre for Crop Improvement Technology, in Durham University's School of Biological and Biomedical Sciences, said the finding could be an important aid in crop production.

Dr Sadanandom said: "What we have found is a molecular mechanism in plants which stabilises the levels of specific proteins that restrict growth in changing environmental conditions.

"This mechanism works independently of the Gibberellin hormone, meaning we can use this new understanding for a novel approach to encourage the plant to grow, even when under stress.

"If you are a farmer in the field then you don't want your wheat to stop growing whenever it is faced with adverse conditions.

"If we can encourage the crops to keep growing, even when faced by adverse conditions, it could give us greater yields and lead to sustainable intensification of food production that we must achieve to meet the demands on the planet's finite resources."

.


Related Links
Durham University
Farming Today - Suppliers and Technology






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





FARM NEWS
Locust genome exposes "hundreds" of pesticide targets
Paris (AFP) Jan 14, 2014
Chinese scientists said Tuesday they had unravelled the genetic code of the locust, laying bare "hundreds" of genes that can be targeted by insecticides. The genetic code of Locusta migratoria is remarkably big - at 6.5 gigabytes, it is the largest animal genome sequenced so far, they reported in the journal Nature Communications. Large clusters of the insect's genes are associated with ... read more


FARM NEWS
China's pollution seen from space

Charles River Analytics Develops Satellite Image Processing System for NASA

Earth may be heaver than thought due to invisible belt of dark matter

More BARREL Balloons Take to the Skies

FARM NEWS
Northrop Grumman and Trex Enterprises to Introduce Celestial Navigation to Soldier Precision Targeting Laser Systems

GPS Traffic Maps for Leatherback Turtles Show Hotspots to Prevent Accidental Fishing Deaths

China to upgrade homegrown GPS to improve accuracy

Beidou to cover world by 2020 with 30 satellites

FARM NEWS
Oldest trees are growing faster, storing more carbon as they age

Climate scientists bark up the big tree

Microbe community changes may reduce Amazon's ability to lock up carbon dioxide

Iconic Australasian trees found as fossils in South America

FARM NEWS
Boeing Finds Significant Potential in "Green Diesel" as a Sustainable Jet Fuel

Renewable chemical ready for biofuels scale-up

More to biofuel production than yield

NREL Finds a New Cellulose Digestion Mechanism by a Fast-eating Enzyme

FARM NEWS
Cobalt catalysts allow researchers to duplicate the complicated steps of photosynthesis

UNC researchers harness sun's energy during day for use at night

KYOCERA Solar Helps Connecticut Residents Reduce Environmental Impact

Hydrogen fuel, not electricity, could be future of solar power

FARM NEWS
Blown away? US suspends wind power subsidies, for now

Maine offshore wind project appears on track for federal funding

No Evidence of Residential Property Impacts Near Wind Turbines

China to Power Ahead as Wind Turbine Rotor Blade Market Leader for Foreseeable Future

FARM NEWS
Goldman Sachs pulls out from Pacific coal export project

Colombia stops Drummond coal shipments over environmental row

China coal mine accidents kill 1,049 in 2013: govt

Australia gives environmental nod to $5.7 bln coal project

FARM NEWS
China army officer's gold, liquor haul seized in graft expose

Build it and they will believe, says defiant China tycoon

China starts relaxing one-child policy

China sets dissident trial date as EU envoy criticises rights record




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement