. Energy News .

Opponents fail to overturn shark protection deal
by Staff Writers
Bangkok (AFP) March 14, 2013

Japan, China and other nations that support shark fishing on Thursday lost a bid to overturn a landmark deal that offers global trade protection for several species of the ocean's oldest predator.

A decision to restrict exports of the oceanic whitetip shark, the porbeagle, three types of hammerhead and the manta ray won final approval by the 178-member Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES).

"This is an historic day for marine conservation," Glenn Sant of wildlife trade protection group Traffic said after the decision at a major wildlife conference in Bangkok.

"Shark populations are in freefall, but have been thrown a lifeline today -- CITES has finally listened to the scientists."

Rather than a complete ban, countries will be required to regulate trade by issuing export permits to ensure the sustainability of sharks in the wild, otherwise they could face sanctions by members of CITES, a global treaty which protects some 35,000 species.

The United States hailed the agreement as a "historic moment in shark and ray conservation".

"The decline of these commercially exploited species is a global challenge that must be met with global solutions," said the head of the US delegation, Bryan Arroyo.

The move was agreed by member states on Monday but required final approval at the meeting's plenary session.

Opponents including Japan, China and India failed to garner enough support to challenge the earlier decision on the oceanic whitetip and the hammerheads.

Japan has a long history of shark fishing and its fishermen fear that moves to control the trade could hit an industry still recovering from the impact of a devastating tsunami that hit the country's northeast coast in March 2011.

Along with China, Japan argued that regional fishing bodies should be left to regulate shark exports.

"Of course we are disappointed," Shingo Ota from Japan's Fisheries Agency said of the outcome.

"We are very much equally concerned about the status of those shark species, but the question is whether CITES is best placed or should we rely more on regional fisheries organisations," he told AFP.

Hailing the meeting's refusal to overturn the deal, Susan Lieberman of The Pew Charitable Trusts described it as "the most significant day for the ocean in the 40-year history of CITES".

The species now join the great white shark, the whale shark and the basking shark, which already enjoy international trade controls. Members have 18 months to introduce the new measures.

"This is a historic moment, where science has prevailed over politics, as sharks and manta rays are being obliterated from our oceans," said Carlos Drews of WWF.

"This decision will put a major dent in the uncontrolled trade in shark meat and fins, which is rapidly destroying populations of these precious animals to feed the growing demand for luxury goods."

Humans kill about 100 million sharks each year, mostly for their fins, according to the UN Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO), and conservationists are warning that dozens of species are under threat.

Ninety percent of the world's sharks have disappeared over the past 100 years, mostly because of overfishing in countries such as Indonesia, the FAO says.

Shark-fin soup was once a luxury enjoyed by China's elite, but shark populations have been decimated around the world as the country's 1.3 billion people have grown wealthier and incorporated it into their festivities.

While the Chinese government has banned shark-fin soup from state banquets, and some five-star hotels in Hong Kong and Singapore have dropped it from their menus, the burgeoning middle-class in China continues to stoke demand.


Related Links
Farming Today - Suppliers and Technology

Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Memory Foam Mattress Review

Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News

Get Our Free Newsletters
Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear


Farmers who commit totally to sell locally can make a profit
University Park PA (SPX) Mar 14, 2013
Farmers can make a profit selling their produce directly to local businesses, but they must not let possible new costs weaken their commitment to the new venture, according to an international team of researchers. "We found that the farmers who really made a conscious decision to sell local and who made more of a commitment tended to do better than those who are just testing the waters wit ... read more

Significant reduction in temperature and vegetation seasonality over northern latitudes

GOCE: the first seismometer in orbit

Japan's huge quake heard from space: study

Space station to watch for Earth disasters

China city searching for 'modern Marco Polo'

China targeting navigation system's global coverage by 2020

Russian GLONASS space satellite group again at full strength

Tracking trains with satellite precision

Are tropical forests resilient to global warming?

Protected areas prevent deforestation in Amazon rainforest

Logging debris gives newly planted Douglas-fir forests a leg-up

Nations boost efforts to curb illegal logging

Biodiesel algae: Starvation diets damage health

Biobatteries catch breath

Using photosynthesis to make chemical compounds

Duckweed as a cost-competitive raw material for biofuel production

The carbon footprint of grid-scale battery technologies

Stanford researchers map out an alternative energy future for New York

5MW Kalaeloa Solar Farm Now Generating Power on Oahu

Eltek Solar Inverter Now CEC/ERP Qualified

Court ruling halts British wind farm

British National Trust opposes wind farms

Wind power as a cost-effective long-term hedge against natural gas prices

RMT Safely Constructs Seven Wind Projects in 2012

China mine accident kills 21: state media

China dissident artist Ai Weiwei to release rock album

Petitioners seek rights as China parliament meets

Award-winning Tibetan writer denied China passport

Anger over attack on Hong Kong journalists in China

The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2012 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement