Energy News  





.
FARM NEWS
Scientists Find The First Evidence Of Genetically Modified Plants In The Wild

Scientists currently performing field research in North Dakota have discovered the first evidence of established populations of genetically modified plants in the wild.
by Staff Writers
Washington DC (SPX) Aug 16, 2010
Research is continually emerging on the impacts of invasive species, pollution and environmental disasters on ecosystems and communities. Ecological scientists will discuss widespread environmental changes-from the recent discovery of genetically modified plants in the wild to the implications of mercury found in bottlenose dolphin skin, and even exploring society's reactive mode toward environmental disasters in the U.S.-at the Ecological Society of America's 95th Annual Meeting in Pittsburgh.

Below is a sampling of some of the research to be presented on a wide array of environmental issues:

Genetically modified canola plants in the wild
Scientists currently performing field research in North Dakota have discovered the first evidence of established populations of genetically modified plants in the wild.

Meredith G. Schafer from the University of Arkansas and colleagues from North Dakota State University, California State University, Fresno and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency established transects of land along 5,400 km of interstate, state and county roads in North Dakota from which they collected, photographed and tested 406 canola plants.

The results-which were recorded in early July and are set to be presented at ESA's Annual Meeting in Pittsburgh-provide strong evidence that transgenic plants have established populations outside of agricultural fields in the U.S. Of the 406 plants collected, 347 (86%) tested positive for CP4 EPSPS protein (confers tolerance to glyphosate herbicide) or PAT protein (confers tolerance to glufosinate herbicide).

"There were also two instances of multiple transgenes in single individuals," said one of the study's coauthors Cynthia Sagers, University of Arkansas.

"Varieties with multiple transgenic traits have not yet been released commercially, so this finding suggests that feral populations are reproducing and have become established outside of cultivation. These observations have important implications for the ecology and management of native and weedy species, as well as for the management of biotech products in the U.S."

Other sessions on invasive species include:
The contributed oral session "Bioeconomic approach to risk assessment for invasive animals in trade in the United States" led by Reuben P. Keller, University of Chicago; the poster session "Hurricane Katrina and the potential replacement of one ecosystem engineer by another on two Mississippi barrier islands" by Christine A. Bertz and J. Stephen Brewer, University of Mississippi; and the poster session "Early detection of invasive plant species: linking management needs with invasive species science" led by Daniel A. Sarr, Klamath Network-National Park Service.

Detecting mercury in bottlenose dolphins
Since 1997, researchers have been collecting skin biopsies from the Sarasota Bay, Florida bottlenose dolphin population as part of an ongoing health monitoring program.

Debra L. Miller from the University of Georgia and colleagues performed the first histopathological examination of the biopsies to determine the possible adverse effects and mechanisms of tissue distribution of mercury in the bottlenose dolphin population.

In their upcoming presentation at ESA's Annual Meeting, the scientists will report, among other findings, that mercury concentrations increased in dolphin biopsy samples as the dolphins aged.

Results also suggest greater binding of mercury in the skin during the winter season and a possible link between mercury concentration and keratin production. Miller will discuss implications for the conservation of dolphins and other animals and for future knowledge on mercury and human health.

Other sessions on pollution and toxicity include:

The poster session "The effects of salt on anti-predator escape behaviors and size in green frog tadpoles (Rana clamitans)" led by George A. Samra, Pennsylvania State University; the organized oral session "Ozone pollution compromises plant defense responses to insect herbivory" led by Joshua R. Herr, Pennsylvania State University; and the contributed oral session "Mechanisms of cadmium toxicity and tolerance in Populus" led by Brahma Reddy Induri, West Virginia University.

Environmental disasters in the U.S
During the Opening Plenary Panel at ESA's Annual Meeting, a panel of experts will discuss several case studies from prominent environmental disasters, including the discovery of Asian carp in the Great Lakes and the Deepwater Horizon Oil Rig accident, and will address the ways in which society assesses risk and reacts to, instead of prevents, grave outcomes.

Robert Twilley from Louisiana State University, an expert in wetlands on the coast of the Gulf of Mexico, will highlight how wetland degradation exacerbated the impact of hurricanes in the region and will discuss the recent oil disaster in the Gulf.

David Lodge from the University of Notre Dame, an invasive species expert, will showcase past invasions and discuss the risk of similar disasters in the future, such as the spread of Asian Carp to the Great Lakes.

David Dzombak from Carnegie Mellon University, an expert in water quality engineering and contaminated site remediation, will discuss contaminated sediment and public health in New Orleans following the flooding from Hurricane Katrina.

Baruch Fischhoff, an expert in risk analysis and decision science from Carnegie Mellon University, will address the communication of risk between experts and non-experts, particularly in areas such as human health, climate change and the environment.




Share This Article With Planet Earth
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit
YahooMyWebYahooMyWeb GoogleGoogle FacebookFacebook



Related Links
Ecological Society of America
Farming Today - Suppliers and Technology



Tempur-Pedic Mattress Comparison

Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News
FARM NEWS
China says no evidence milk powder caused infant breasts
Beijing (AFP) Aug 15, 2010
China's health ministry said Sunday an investigation had found no evidence that milk powder produced by a Chinese company caused three infant girls to grow breasts. The clinical investigation found the hormone levels in the baby formula were within the normal range, health ministry spokesman Deng Haihua told a news conference in Beijing, according to a transcript on the ministry's website. ... read more

.
Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
  


FARM NEWS
Germany vs. Google, Round 2

Satellite data yield better wetlands maps

Terra Satellite Sees Intense Fires And Smoke Over Western Russia

NASA Video Shows Global Reach Of Pollution From Fires

FARM NEWS
India Launches Satellite-Based Navigation System

Putin wants Russian satnav system in new cars from 2012

Lockheed Martin-Built GPS Satellite Surpasses 10 Years On-Orbit

Sea Star Line GUARDIAN SERVICE Offers Reefer Monitoring, Tracking, Tracing And Control

FARM NEWS
US converts Brazilian debt into environmental protection

Global Tropical Forests Threatened By 2100

Winds of political change blow through Malaysian jungles

Indonesia 'woefully inadequate' on illegal loggers: probe

FARM NEWS
Wide Range Of Plants Offer Cellulosic Biofuel Potential, Ecological Diversity

Linde Starts Up New York Carbon Dioxide Plant

Switchgrass Lessens Soil Nitrate Loss Into Waterways

ICCC Lab Becomes National Leader In Biodiesel Testing

FARM NEWS
Washington State Future Home To One Of The World's Largest Solar Projects

SEIA And GTM Research Partner For Comprehensive U.S. Solar Market Analysis

One Of Michigan's Largest Solar Energy Systems To Be Built

Town Of Superior Set To Install Solar At Water Treatment Facilities

FARM NEWS
Canada looks to utilize wind energy

LADWP Approves New Wind Project

German wind growth down, exports strong

Study Shows Stability And Utility Of Floating Wind Turbines

FARM NEWS
21 dead, 12 trapped in China mine accidents

Chinese rescuers battle to save 24 trapped in mine

Philippines police detain 80 Chinese miners

China mine owner detained after 28 die in colliery fire

FARM NEWS
Book critical of China's premier on sale in Hong Kong

China dissident's PM book set for release amid jail threat

Hong Kong people rally to save Cantonese language

UN 'concerned' over Nepal's repatriation of Tibetans


The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2010 - SpaceDaily. AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement