Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy
. Farming News .

To swallow or to spit? New medicines for llamas and alpacas
by Staff Writers
Vienna, Austria (SPX) Oct 24, 2013

Oral administration of drugs works best for llamas and alpacas. (Photo: Mit freundlicher Genehmigung von news4vets)

Llamas and alpacas are becoming increasingly popular in Europe and are highly appreciated as trekking animals and as sources of wool. Although they are robust, they occasionally fall ill but there are no authorized drugs for the species on the market.

Researchers at the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna (Vetmeduni Vienna) have developed an oral "paste" that can be mixed with drugs and used to treat camelids for a wide variety of diseases. A recent article in the Journal of Veterinary Parasitology reports a case of successful treatment.

South American camelids, especially llamas and alpacas, are very susceptible to infections caused by endoparasites. The so-called small liver fluke (Dicrocoelium dendriticum) is particularly problematic and infections with this parasite are frequently fatal.

Moreover, camelids are prone to stress and together with their tendency to spit (especially when they do not like the taste of something) this very often results in underdosing if they are given medicine to swallow. Inadequate treatment of endoparasites leads to progression of the pathological changes and can be lethal for the animals. Underdosing of antiparasitic drugs may also lead to the emergence of anthelmintic resistance.

A small volume with a high concentration
Two scientists from the Vetmeduni Vienna now report a solution. Agnes Dadak from the Institute of Pharmacology and Sonja Franz from the Clinic for Ruminants have jointly developed a palatable paste that the animals swallow willingly and that allows the administration of highly concentrated drugs in small volumes.

Drugs that are already approved for use in other species but not available in a concentration appropriate for use in llamas and alpacas can be incorporated in the paste in the correct dose.

To treat small liver fluke, the vets added the drug praziquantel to the paste to give a final dose of 50mg/kg body weight. This extremely high dose turns out to be exactly right for the successful treatment of the disease in camelids.

Swallowing is the best choice
Administering drugs orally to camelids has significant advantages. Topical treatment of the animals is generally ineffective because of their thick skin, which is not easily permeated by drugs. Furthermore, many active substances cannot be provided as injections due to their chemical characteristics. "Our paste seems to be extremely useful in treating the animals. We are now working on incorporating other important drugs for use against different diseases in llamas and alpacas," says Dadak.

A paste for the whole herd
Llamas and alpacas are normally kept in herds, so it makes sense to treat the entire stock if an infection with the small liver fluke is detected. "We are happy to make our experience and scientific knowledge of camelids available to people who keep these animals, as well as to veterinary surgeons. Our development provides a scientifically sound basis for ensuring the health of the animals," says Franz.

The study current "Efficacy and safety of oral praziquantel against Dicrocoelium dendriticum in llamas" by Agnes Dadak, Claudia Wieser, Anja Joachim and Sonja Franz was published in the Journal of Veterinary Parasitology.


Related Links
University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna
Farming Today - Suppliers and Technology

Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News

New soil testing kit for third world countries
Madison WI (SPX) Oct 22, 2013
Researchers at the University of Maryland and Columbia University have developed a new soil testing kit designed to help farmers in third world countries. On-the-spot soil testing could have major impact in improving crop yields due to poor soils. The kit contains battery-operated instruments and safe materials for agricultural extension agents to handle in the field. They can test for the ... read more

New evidence on lightning strikes

How Earth's rotation affects vortices in nature

Tiny drones create new, highly detailed mapping of Matterhorn

Satellites proposed as way to bring early detection of wildfires

Software Uses Cyborg Swarm To Map Unknown Environs

DLR, Thales Alenia Space and SES Develop Innovative Space-Based Air Traffic Control Monitoring System

Boeing, China Southern and China Aviation Authorities Establish Precision Navigation Procedures

Plan maps development of China's sat-nav industry

Risk of Amazon rainforest dieback is higher than IPCC projects

Economic Assessment of Mountain Pine Beetle Timber Salvage

Without plants, Earth would cook under billions of tons of additional carbon

A few tree species dominate Amazon

The potential of straw for the energy mix has been underestimated

Scientists Identify Key Genes for Increasing Oil Content in Plant Leaves

Ethanol Safety Seminar Planned in Tacoma

US Biodiesel Production Surpasses Set Target for Second Straight Year

Solar panels can be used to provide heating and air conditioning

Cleaner and greener cities with integrated transparent solar cells

Simpler Manufacturing Cuts Cost Of Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Solarcells

New NRDC Crowdfunding Campaign to Connect Schools to Solar Power

Spain launches first offshore wind turbine

Key German lawmaker: End renewable energy subsidies by 2020

Installation of the first AREVA turbines at Trianel Windpark Borkum and Global Tech 1

Trump's suit to halt wind farm project to be heard in November

Two China miners saved 10 days after flood, 10 confirmed dead

Calculating the true cost of a ton of mountaintop coal

Ukraine designates 45 coal mines for sale in privatization push

German coal mine turns village into ghost town

China paper's front-page demand for journalist release

China paper's front-page demand for journalist release

Chinese villagers clash with police, injuring 27: reports

Outspoken China professor fired for poor teaching: university

The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement