Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Farming News .




FARM NEWS
Tracking Sugar Movement in Plants
by Karen McNulty Walsh for BNL News
Upton NY (SPX) Apr 10, 2014


Brookhaven Lab plant scientist Benjamin Babst with corn and sorghum plants. Studies in model plants such as pea, like the one described below, could point to ways to improve these bioenergy crops.

A new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences by scientists at the University of Queensland, Australia, overturns a long-held theory in plant science. Researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory who are co-authors on this paper conducted critical radiotracer studies that support the new theory that plant sugars play a dominant role in regulating branching at plant stems. While branching has relevance in agriculture, it is also very important in bioenergy crop production.

Brookhaven plant biologist Benjamin Babst and Brittany Wienclaw, who was a summer intern as part of the DOE Science Undergraduate Laboratory Internship program at Brookhaven while working on her degree at the University of New Haven, conducted an essential experiment to verify that sugars play a key role in apical dominance and the regulation of plant bud growth.

The aim of their part of this study was to test if sugars produced in leaves via photosynthesis move downward through plants in greater quantities when shoot tips are removed, and quickly enough to trigger bud growth farther down.

To trace the sugars, the scientists first had to add a radioactive "tag" to these molecules. The tag they used was a positron-emitting isotope of carbon, carbon-11, incorporated into carbon dioxide. When they administered this labeled CO2 to plant leaves, the plants incorporated the radioactive carbon into sugars via photosynthesis. The scientists then tracked the labeled sugars throughout the plant using detectors placed along the plant stem.

The time taken for the 11C-labeled sugars to move between two detectors on upper and lower regions of the stem was used to calculate sugar transport speeds. The scientists also monitored how much sugar accumulated at different positions, including where previously dormant buds began to sprout in response to clipping the plants' apical shoots.

"We found that upon decapitation of the plant, there is a rapid increase in sugar delivery to the buds, which promotes bud outgrowth," Babst said. The sugars move about 100 times faster than auxin, a plant hormone previously believed to regulate bud growth. This finding supports the idea that sugar-not auxin-is the key signaling molecule for this immediate response to clipping.

"Auxin plays a secondary role later in the process," Babst said.

The Brookhaven experiment further supports the idea that the demand for sugar in intact, actively growing apical shoots limits the availability of this nutrient to the rest of the plant, thus normally keeping lower branch bud growth in check.

"Only a few labs in the world have the capability, using the carbon-11 radioisotope, to do the type of experiment that we did to see rapid changes in carbon allocation immediately following a treatment, such as shoot tip removal," Babst said.

"Ben's work was critical for this study," said Christine Beveridge of the University of Queensland, Australia, who was the lead author on the paper. "His finding that sugars move at 150 cm per hour along the stem is amazing. The technique available in his lab is truly first class and an invaluable resource for plant scientists worldwide."

Brookhaven's role in this research was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science, which has an ongoing interest in furthering understanding of plant functions that have relevance to generating bioenergy.

For example, said Babst, "Branching has a big impact on the display of a plant's leaves to capture sunlight, like arrays of solar panels. Branching can also enhance or hurt the performance of plants growing amongst competitors. And the amount of branching also influences how much biomass a plant has-of particular interest because stems represent the bulk of the biomass that we can harvest for biofuels."

Understanding the factors that influence branching in the pea plants used in this study may offer valuable insights to help optimize the growth of bioenergy grasses such as switchgrass and sorghum-where, because the buds and shoot tips are inaccessible without damaging the plant and changing function, it would be impossible to tease out these details.

Scientific paper: "Sugar demand, not auxin, is the initial regulator of apical dominance"

.


Related Links
Brookhaven National Laboratory
Farming Today - Suppliers and Technology






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





FARM NEWS
The tiniest greenhouse gas emitters
Vienna, Austria (SPX) Apr 09, 2014
Climate feedbacks from decomposition by soil microbes are one of the biggest uncertainties facing climate modelers. A new study from the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) and the University of Vienna shows that these feedbacks may be less dire than previously thought. The dynamics among soil microbes allow them to work more efficiently and flexibly as they break ... read more


FARM NEWS
DMCii help Dutch company eLEAF provide much needed crop information to African farmers

China preps satellite to help detect quakes

NASA Radar Watches Over California's Aging Levees

A satellite view of volcanoes finds the link between ground deformation and eruption

FARM NEWS
PSLV-C24 Launches India's Second Dedicated Navigation Satellite IRNSS-1B

Indian navigation satellite soars into orbit, step closer to own GPS-like system

FAA Approves DeLorme Communicator For Service In Alaska

LockMart Taps General Dynamics For Network Element On GPS 3 Birds

FARM NEWS
Sage grouse losing habitat to fire as endangered species decision looms

Save the caribou, save the boreal forest: ecologists

Winrock develops new method for quantifying carbon emissions from logging

Researchers design trees that make it easier to produce paper

FARM NEWS
US Navy 'game-changer': converting seawater into fuel

Trees go high-tech: process turns cellulose into energy storage devices

Unzipping the biofuel potential of populars

Engineered bacteria produce biofuel alternative for high-energy rocket fuel

FARM NEWS
Renewable energy market share climbs despite 2013 dip in investments

Organic Solar Cells More Efficient With Molecules Face-to-Face

String Inverters Increasingly Used in Megawatt-Scale PV Projects

Greenpeace sees growth in renewable energy use

FARM NEWS
Scotland wants to secure lead in renewable energy

Global renewable energy investments slumped 14% in 2013: UN

Scotland sees economic growth from energy sector

Wind energy: On the grid, off the checkerboard

FARM NEWS
Rescuers race to save 22 trapped coal miners in China: Xinhua

U.K. Coal may close two deep mines

Your money or your life: coal miner's dilemma mirrors China's

Societal Benefits of Fossil Energy to be at Least 50 Times Greater than Perceived Costs of Carbon

FARM NEWS
Anti-corruption activists back on trial in China

Ming-era 'chicken cup' breaks record for Chinese porcelain

Anti-corruption activists back on trial in China

Tiananmen Square dissident warns Uighur militancy on the rise




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement All images and articles appearing on Space Media Network have been edited or digitally altered in some way. Any requests to remove copyright material will be acted upon in a timely and appropriate manner. Any attempt to extort money from Space Media Network will be ignored and reported to Australian Law Enforcement Agencies as a potential case of financial fraud involving the use of a telephonic carriage device or postal service.