Energy News  





.
FARM NEWS
UN alarmed at huge decline in bee numbers

by Staff Writers
Geneva (AFP) March 10, 2011
The UN on Thursday expressed alarm at a huge decline in bee colonies under a multiple onslaught of pests and pollution, urging an international effort to save the pollinators that are vital for food crops.

Much of the decline, ranging up to 85 percent in some areas, is taking place in the industrialised northern hemisphere due to more than a dozen factors, according to a report by the UN's environmental agency.

They include pesticides, air pollution, a lethal pinhead-sized parasite that only affects bee species in the northern hemisphere, mismanagement of the countryside, the loss of flowering plants and a decline in beekeepers in Europe.

"The way humanity manages or mismanages its nature-based assets, including pollinators, will in part define our collective future in the 21st century," said UNEP executive director Achim Steiner.

"The fact is that of the 100 crop species that provide 90 percent of the world's food, over 70 are pollinated by bees," he added.

Wild bees and especially honey bee colonies from hives are regarded as the most prolific pollinators of large fields or crops.

Overall, pollinators are estimated to contribute 153 billion euros ($212 billion) worldwide or 9.5 percent of the total value of food production, especially fruit and vegetables, according to the report.

Honey bee colony declines in recent years have reached 10 to 30 percent in Europe, 30 percent in the United States,and up to 85 percent in Middle East, said scientist Peter Neumann, one of the authors of the first ever UN report on the issue.

But in South America, Africa and Australia there were no reports of high losses.

"It is a very complex issue. There are a lot of interactive factors and one country alone is not able to solve the problem, that's for sure. We need to have an international network, global approaches," added Neumann of the Swiss government's Bee Research Centre.

Some of the mechanisms behind the four-decades-old trend, which appears to have intensified in the late 1990s, are not understood. UNEP warned that the broad issue of countryside management and conservation was involved.

"The bees will get the headlines in this story," UNEP spokesman Nick Nuttall told journalists.

"But in a sense they are an indicator of the wider changes that are happening in the countryside but also urban environments, in terms of whether nature can continue to provide the services as it has been doing for thousands or millions of years in the face of acute environmental change," he added.

Nonetheless, scientists have been unable so far to quantify the direct impact of bee decline on crops or plants, and Neumann insisted that some of the impact was qualitative.

Citing British research, the report estimated that pollination by managed honey bees is worth 22.8 billion to 57 billion euros in terms of crop yields, and that some fruit, seed and nut crops would decrease by more than 90 percent without them.

One key driving force behind bee destruction in Europe and North America has been a type of mite, the varroa destructor pest, which attacks bees and that beekeepers struggle to control, Neumann said.

"It's quite shocking how little we know about this essential pest of honey bees although it has caused havoc in agriculture for more than 20 years."

"African bees are tolerant, we don't know why," he added.

Meanwhile, frequent changes in land use, degradation and fragmentation of fields, trade carrying hostile species such as the Asian hornet into France or virulent fungi, chemical spraying and gardening insecticides as well as changing seasons due to climate change have added to the hostile environment for bees.




Share This Article With Planet Earth
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit
YahooMyWebYahooMyWeb GoogleGoogle FacebookFacebook



Related Links
Farming Today - Suppliers and Technology



Tempur-Pedic Mattress Comparison

Newsletters :: SpaceDaily Express :: SpaceWar Express :: TerraDaily Express :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News
FARM NEWS
Mexico approves GM maize pilot project
Mexico City (AFP) March 9, 2011
Mexico has approved its first pilot project to grow genetically-modified (GM) maize, a move expected to draw fire from environmental groups who fear its impact on treasured local corn. The Agriculture Ministry said in a statement Tuesday that it had approved the project to grow GM yellow corn developed by the US biotech giant Monsanto on one hectare (2.5 acres) of land in the northern Tamaul ... read more

.
Get Our Free Newsletters Via Email
  


FARM NEWS
NASA Warns Ice Melt Speeding Up

GOCE Delivers On Its Promise

NASA reels from climate science setbacks

NASA's Bolden defends Earth science

FARM NEWS
Fred Meyer Stores And ECOtality To Install Blink EV Charging Stations

Skyhook's Location To Be Embedded In Next Gen Portable Entertainment System

UK scientists warn of 'dangerous over-reliance' on GPS

Improved Method Developed To Locate Ships In Storms

FARM NEWS
Trading places: Kenyans swap carbon roles to save forest

Scientists Study Control Of Invasive Tree In Western US

Four New Species Of Zombie Ant Fungi Discovered

Climate Change Causing Demise Of Lodgepole Pine In Western North America

FARM NEWS
Full Harvest Of Ford Greener Fuel Solutions

Solazyme And Dow Form Alliance

Enzymes From Garden Compost Could Favour Bioethanol Production

Top Advanced Biofuels Groups Meet In Washington

FARM NEWS
Ultrafast Laser 'Scribing' Technique Cuts Cost And Improves Efficiency Of Solar Cells

Solar Rainbow To Install 1MW System On Omni Holdings Complex

SunPower Signs 48MW Solar Power Supply Agreement With Toshiba

Hayward And REC Solar Unveil 1MW Solar System

FARM NEWS
American Electric Technologies Announces Deployment With Emergya Wind Technologies

GL Garrad Hassan Delivers Wind Map Of Lebanon

Eon to build fifth U.K. offshore wind farm

GL Garrad Hassan Launches Onshore Wind Resource Mapping For UK

FARM NEWS
China says over 2,400 dead in coal mines in 2010

FARM NEWS
Dalai Lama 'retirement' puts spotlight on Tibetan elections

Dalai Lama: celebrated, but frustrated

China says Dalai playing 'tricks' with resignation

Chilling student death in China prompts probe


The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2010 - SpaceDaily. AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement